In Michigan, the laws preventing possession of certain firearms are important to understand if you’ve had issues with unlawful possession of a firearm charge. At The Law Offices of Barton Morris, we’re committed to helping our clients understand firearm laws and what you should know about these laws and their penalties. If you find yourself charged with felony firearm violations, call The Law Offices of Barton Morris to speak with one of our experienced attorneys. 

Firearm

Michigan Statute 750.224b

This statute relates to short-barreled shotguns or rifles, and strictly prohibits citizens from making, manufacturing, transferring, or possessing one of these firearms. A short-barreled shotgun or rifles is described as 26 inches or less. There are exceptions to this law for legally-owned or manufactured firearms that match this description, though these exceptions must also be compliant with restrictions from other codes and regulations.

Gun barrel

Michigan Statute 750.224c

Michigan Statute 750.224c relates to armor-piercing ammunition. This statute prohibits manufacturing, distributing, selling, or using this type of ammunition. This statute also has limited exceptions to the restrictions, mainly for licensed dealers of ammunition who comply with this and other restrictions by law. There are also exceptions for this statute for police use, as long as this use is compliant with other codes and regulations.

Bullets

Michigan Statute 750.224e

This Michigan statute is intended to prohibit converting firearms into more dangerous firearms. Per this restriction, converting a semiautomatic firearm into a fully automatic firearm is prohibited. Under this statute, teaching someone else how to perform this conversion is also prohibited and is punishable by law. A fully automatic firearm is defined as one that requires no renewed pressure on the firearm’s trigger for each successive shot. There are limited exceptions for this statute. 

Gavel

Penalties For Violations

These statutes are strict and violating any one of these three is considered a felony, and the penalties for a violation can range from four to five years in prison and up to $2,500 in fines. However, if you are charged with violations of one of these statutes, you should speak with an experienced lawyer for help arguing your case with a judge for a lighter sentence. In Michigan, a judge has the authority to decide a “reasonable” sentence, meaning that your attorney may be able to advocate for a better outcome in your favor. 

In Michigan, the statutes regarding felony firearm possession are important to understand if you have been charged with a felony firearm violation. Unlawful possession of a firearm is a serious charge and you deserve an experienced, compassionate, and dedicated attorney to help you with your case. At The Law Offices of Barton Morris, you can work with experienced Michigan felony firearm lawyers who are ready to defend you. Learn more and contact us today for a free consultation.